How Do I Identify a Concussion?

How Do I Identify a Concussion?

How do you identify a concussion? The most common signs and symptoms of concussion are: Headache feeling like in a fog emotional instability loss of consciousness amnesia, trouble balancing irritability slowed reaction times drowsiness This is not an exhaustive list, however it does cover most of the symptoms. If you suspect you or someone you know has sustained a concussion, they should stop playing, and seek an appropriate health care provider to complete a more detailed assessment.   Information adapted for the Consensus statement on concussion in sport—the 5thinternational conference on concussion in sport held in Berlin, October...
Concussion – Part 2 of 3

Concussion – Part 2 of 3

When does it resolve? Most concussions resolve within 2 weeks to 1 month However in some instances symptoms persist. These persistent symptoms can linger for much longer and pose significant functional restrictions to regular day-to-day function at home, at school or at work. Once you enter into the persistent level of symptoms it is highly recommended that you see a health care provider, to assess the specific areas being affected as well as work out a treatment plan. Why do I hear about it so much more now? Concussions are becoming much more widely diagnosed which allows for safer and more effective treatment. As our knowledge grows about the negative long term effects following a concussion it becomes more important to identify those who are at risk for persistent symptoms. Chonic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) has been widely discussed lately in the media, however the most recent information available has yet to draw a definitive link between recurrent concussions and the development of CTE. Baseline testing has also been a major news generator lately with many stories on numerous news outlets. The consensus statement suggests that at this point in time there is not adequate information to suggest that all athletes should be undergoing pre-season baseline neuropsychological testing. The consensus statement does suggest that a pre-season athlete history can be of use in placing athletes in varying risk categories based on previous concussions (duration, symptoms, and...
Concussion What? Who? When? Why? How?- Part 1 of 3

Concussion What? Who? When? Why? How?- Part 1 of 3

What is concussion? Concussion is defined as a diffuse injury to the brain. It can occur from a direct blow to the head, neck, face OR impact to another part of the body, which causes transmission of impulsive force to the head.1 The definition of concussion is continuously changing through a worldwide panel of experts who meet regularly to keep up to date with the most recent research and care. Concussions can have many symptoms and present differently in every instance, making them difficult to manage Who does it affect? Concussion can affect anyone. This is not an injury that exclusively affects athletes. It can occur from a fall at home, on the ice, in a car accident or sport Concussion can affect people of all ages assessment tools to help identify concussion in youth from ages 5-12 (Child SCAT 5) and Adults older than 13 years old (SCAT...
Taking the Pain Out of Raking

Taking the Pain Out of Raking

Well it is that time of year again and some of us are dreading all that raking. The only fun part is that our toddlers love to jump into that massive pile of leaves and spread them all out again. Here are some tips from your local physiotherapists to prevent any possible injuries caused by raking.   Clear the yard. Before you rake, pick up all the fallen branches and debris. Warm up. As with any physical activity, you should warm up your muscles first with 10 minutes of light exercise, such as walking. Stretch lightly after raking to relieve tension. Pace yourself. Raking is an aerobic activity. Take frequent breaks, and replenish fluids to prevent dehydration. Watch what you’re raking. Don’t let a hat or scarf block your vision. Watch out for large rocks, low branches, tree stumps and uneven surfaces. Wear the right footwear. Shoes or boots with slip-resistant soles will help prevent falls. Use the right rake. Choose one that feels comfortable for your height and strength, not too short or too long. Allow space between your hands on the shaft of the rake to increase your leverage. Choose a rake that has a padded handle or wear gloves to reduce vibration. Don’t throw leaves over your shoulder or to the side. That requires a twisting motion that places undue stress on your back. Variety is key. Alternate your leg and arm positions often. When picking up leaves, bend at the knees, not the waist. Keep leaf piles small, which will be much to your toddlers dismay so you don’t strain your back while gathering the...
Breathe

Breathe

Breathing for Stress Relief Workshop May 9th, 2017 – 20:00 h   Mardaloop Sport Physiotherapy 1517 – 34th Ave SW Calgary, AB   Why is stress relief relevant for me and my health? What does breathing have to do with stress relief? What can I do in my daily life to help stress relief?  Most of us experience various kinds of stresses in our daily lives. From school to jobs to taking care of a family to performing elite sports to the experience of emotional stressors – our lives are very busy. This workshop will give you an insight on the physiological ways stress affects our physical body and the relevance of stress relief for a healthy wellbeing. Furthermore you will be equipped with some simple techniques to use in your everyday lives to calm body and mind. If you would like to join this workshop, please sign up at the front desk and bring a blanket and a pillow. I am looking forward to see you! Jella...
Sit Well

Sit Well

  How to sit well – Ergonomic Workshop May 9th, 2017 – 19:00 h   Mardaloop Sport Physiotherapy 1517 – 34th Ave SW Calgary, AB   Why is a proper sitting posture important for me?   How can I rearrange my working space from an ergonomic perspective?   What else can I do to prevent posture-related health issues? During this workshop we will address the relevance of proper posture behind your desk, some simple ways to adjust your working environment to your individual physical body as well as learn some techniques to keep moving during long office hours. Please sign up for this workshop at the front desk. If you have any questions, feel free to ask. I am looking forward to see you!...
Snow Shoveling

Snow Shoveling

Winter is upon us and that means shovelling snow! Snow shoveling is a high level aerobic activity that can cause many injuries in the old and young if not done properly. It is a repetitive activity that can cause muscle and joint strain and sprain in the shoulders and low back and certain cardiovascular complications if a person is out of condition or does not lift properly. Generally, children younger than school age and elderly with certain health issues, such as cardiovascular risk, high blood pressure, balance disorder, etc, should NOT shovel snow. w. Individuals between the ages of 20-50 years are at a higher risk of low back injury shoveling snow due to the fact they don’t realize they are out of condition. Snow shoveling can be a good aerobic workout if done properly and if a person is in proper shape it is recommended to shovel for 15 minutes a session. Here are some tips for avoiding winter injuries: Have a snack before you go outside for extra calories to burn in the cold Use sunscreen on your face; snow reflects up to 85% of the sun’s ultraviolet rays Dress warmly in layers, using wool not cotton, and bring an extra set of gloves Shovel small loads of snow and be sure to bend and lift with your legs and not your back Use a shovel that is the right length or ergonomically correct, your back should be straight while lifting the snow Never twist to throw the snow, always move your feet and keep your back straight Take frequent rests; walk around, stand up straight or...
Balance

Balance

Balance boards also known as wobble boards are a great item to have on your New Years list this year. Using a balance board is an effective training tool to improve your fitness. Additionally, studies show that balance board training decreases your chances of injury and limit the chance of falling. Most importantly they can be darn fun to use!   Training Possibilities: Start with basics exercises. You can stand on the board with both feet, using the wall or chair for balance, trying to keep the board level and parallel with the ground. try to maintain balance on the boards for 30 seconds. try this with eyes open with a ‘spotter’ present, progress to eyes closed balance. progress to balancing on one foot. progress to moving the non-weight bearing foot in the air, drawing shapes or ABC’s. As your balance improves you can progress to more difficult exercises: moving the board forward – backwards and side to side while doing any of the above activities (great to develop balance for walking in snow and on icy sidewalks or snowboarding on the slopes) doing squats on the board (great for pre season cross country, telemark or alpine ski training) one leg lunges on the board (great for ice hockey training) Not just for the lower body: With the help of your community physiotherapist, you can safely use the balance board for a variety of other training possibilities. gripping the board with your hands, perform balanced pushups. sitting on the board do abdominal exercises (your tobogganing skills will improve great with this exercise) balance one hand or forearm on the board, do side planks. Use wisely:...